Chances are, if you’ve already chosen to get dental implants, you already know the basics regarding what type of implant you need, the surgical procedure, and the after treatment care. However, something that’s probably a little more vague is the payment process and pricing of dental implants—especially when dealing with various insurance companies. In practices all over the country, dental clinics are evolving to offer more and more methods of payment as well as personalized plans to cater to patients of all economic tiers. Everyone deserves access to proper dental care no matter their financial situation.

Image Dental seeks to clarify these indistinct issues and offer insight that you can read down below. This in-depth overview is also aimed to encourage on-the-fence patients to follow through with their dental implant procedure because of the huge, positive impact implants can have on one’s health.

The first thing to note when thinking about the cost of a dental implant is that not every implant procedure is going to total up to the same amount because of a number of factors—insurance, type of implant, type of sedation used, dental surgeon, and more. Keeping this in mind, the best way to really evaluate the cost of your dental implant operation is to consult with the surgeon that is executing your procedure and most often than not, the practice will be willing to work with you on payment depending on your budget or insurance.

Patients with insurance will obviously have a lower out-of-pocket payment but if you don’t have insurance, don’t worry.  You can still get the dental care you need without having to clean out your wallet all at once. Read below to see what Authority Dental has to say about the cost of dental implants.

How Much do Dental Implants Cost? Full Mouth & Single Tooth Average Prices

“What should you expect to pay for dental implants total?

A single-tooth dental implant cost is $1,000-3,000. The cost of the abutment and crown adds $500-3,000. So, the cost of a full dental implant is $1,500-6,000 in total.

This is the average out-of-pocket price without the help of dental insurance or discount plans. This estimate includes dental implant surgery and some associated costs (like the initial consultation), but your total costs may be even higher if circumstance dictate.”

 

If you don’t have dental insurance and just freaked out over those averages—it’s okay, don’t get intimidated by the numbers. As previously mentioned, there are special payment plans and alternative options for people who want dental implants but don’t have insurance. Dental health professionals understand that not everyone can afford high-end insurance plans and have other bills to pay, so a huge dental bill is not an option. Colgate says there are many options alternative to insurance coverage for dental implants—take a look at two main options below.

Dental Implants Cost Explained

“One way to pay less for implants is to join a dental discount plan, many of which offer 5 to 40 percent off dental implants cost, according to the New York Times. Make sure the plan you’re considering does offer a discount on implants, and check if the plan has a waiting period before you can use the discount…

Another option, if you have a flexible spending account at work, is to use assets from that account to pay part of the cost. Often you can benefit from this by basing coverage on the two-part process of getting an implant: putting in the implant and then covering it with a crown six to 12 weeks later. TIME suggests scheduling the implant at the end of a calendar year, and then receiving your crown the following year. This schedule lets you use money from two years of your pretax flexible spending account, saving you as much as 30 percent if you’re in a higher tax bracket.

Of course, ask your dentist about financing plans as well.”

 

For those of you that already have dental insurance but it doesn’t currently cover dental implant surgery or are looking to get dental insurance in general, you might feel overwhelmed with finding the right option out of the many insurance plans to choose from.

A lot of dental insurance companies offer coverage for the most common procedures and treatments that patients will have to undergo but for more serious procedures like dental implants, some insurance providers might only offer coverage for less expense alternatives such as dentures. When fully deciding on a plan, patients should take care to thoroughly make sure that dental implant surgery expenses will be covered through their policy, not just a simple substitute that is more affordable to the insurance provider. Here’s what Authority Dental has to say about why dental implants might not be covered by insurance and how to get the financial reimbursement you need.

Dental implant insurance: don’t expect much. Reduce your costs with dental plans instead.

“Unfortunately, most dental insurance policies do not cover tooth implants because most companies categorize them as a ‘cosmetic procedure.’ Although if you have gotten dental implants, you know that it’s more than just a cosmetic choice — it can be a life-changing and mouth-saving choice.

But on the upside, many insurance companies are beginning to see the importance of dental implants. They are starting to see the long-term health benefits of getting implants. As of right now though, it’s probably unlikely that your insurance company will cover the cost of dental implants. However, you can still file a claim in an attempt to get some sort of reimbursement.

If you need to get dental implants, your best option is probably using medical insurance, but even then, you will probably have some out-of-pocket expenses. Under many medical insurance plans, implants are considered essential in restoring the jaw for eating and speaking.”

 

If you’re still curious to learn more about your personal costs of dental implant surgery, reach out to Image Dental to get a more precise quote from one of our dental health professionals. Also, watch this view for a visual overview of the content above.

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